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Anger Test / Anger Issues Test

2024 UPDATED with 10 Anger Types

Anger is a natural emotion that we all feel. It is healthy to get angry sometimes. However, it becomes unhealthy when we get angry to an extreme or don’t express anger in a healthy manner. Take this quiz to find out if you are expressing your anger in a healthy way.

Not many people like anger, do they? In fact, most people avoid situations that might make them angry. As a result, you may have never been asked if you have anger issues or not, simply because you are too nice to get angry enough for someone to ask. However, there’s a way for you to find out for yourself. All you need to do is take our anger test and find out if there’s room for improvement in your anger management skills!

Anger Is An Energy - John Lydon

What is the Anger Test?

The Anger Test is a personality test that helps you think about your own anger triggers, so you can better manage them and avoid lashing out at others. It’s based on the idea that people who are prone to anger have common triggers, and the test helps you identify what those are so you can take steps to address them.

Can I use this test to assess others?

You can use it to assess yourself, and you can also use it to assess others. This can be helpful if you’re working with someone who tends to get angry easily and you want to understand their perspective on the causes of their anger.

The test consists of 30 questions. It’s a good idea to answer honestly, because otherwise your results will not be accurate.

Causes of Anger

Anger is a normal human emotion. We all get angry at one time or another. Anger is often our way of responding to something that makes us feel threatened or frustrated, but it can also be a sign that we’re in pain.

The causes of anger are many and varied, but the most common are:

  1. The feeling that you’ve been wronged in some way.
  2. The feeling that your rights have been violated by someone else.
  3. The feeling that someone has done something to hurt you or your loved ones.
  4. The feeling that you’re being treated unfairly by others (this can be based on race, gender identity, sexual orientation, religion... anything).

Types of Anger

Assertive Anger

Assertive anger is a type of constructive anger. It is when the emotion of anger is used positively to achieve a goal or for conflict resolution.

For instance, if you feel mistreated or disrespected at your workplace, you can either express your anger in a passive-aggressive manner or tackle it in a composed yet firm manner. You can talk to your colleague and express whatever hurt you, and state that you expect them to be cautious the next time. This—setting boundaries and being firm about whatever hurt you—in a respectful manner is a display of assertive anger.

There are some signs and symptoms which can indicate that you are struggling with expressing your anger in an assertive manner. Here are some of those signs:

  1. Feeling like you get triggered easily
  2. Having violent outbursts of anger
  3. Feeling out of control when in anger
  4. Resorting to passive-aggressive behavior, taunts, shouting, or physical aggression when in anger

Do you feel that you are experiencing all or some of these symptoms? You could feel regretful and apologetic after your aggressive behavior, but you can’t think rationally in the moment of heat.

If you are struggling with expressing anger in a constructive manner, then there may be some underlying causes you need to address. These include:

  1. Childhood trauma or neglect
  2. Unresolved conflict
  3. Anxiety
  4. Low confidence and esteem
  5. Exposure to violence
  6. Unexposed to healthy relationships and conflict resolution

If you are someone who is struggling with expressing anger in a calm manner, here is what you can do to help yourself:

  1. Identify your triggers: Identifying your triggers can help you avoid things that cause anger, and make you prepared to calm down when you know you are starting to feel angry.
  2. Take a break: When you know you are getting riled up, it is best to excuse yourself and leave the setting for a few minutes. If your colleague or spouse is getting on your nerves, then you should go out for a short walk. Once you have calmed down, you can come back and handle the situation in a more effective manner.
  3. Apologize for your outbursts: If you burst out at a friend or family member during your anger outburst, you should go and genuinely apologize when you have calmed down. Try to repair the damage and promise not to do it again.

If a family member is struggling with managing anger in an effective manner, then you can help in these ways:

  1. Leave the scene when you see they are getting riled up.
  2. Allow them to express their anger however they want (unless they resort to violence). Come back later and discuss how their anger hurt you, and ways in which they could have approached the disagreement better.
  3. Advise them to seek professional help: A therapist can help manage anger in ways that others cannot. So, if a loved one has anger problems, you should support them and motivate them to seek professional help.

Anger does not have to be a negative emotion. If expressed calmly and assertively, it can help specify your needs, create boundaries, and prove to be productive. Try expressing your anger in this manner.

Volatile Anger

Anger is an intense emotion that can be either constructive or destructive. When anger is used in a positive manner, it can help an individual take action, stand up for themselves or others, and find a resolution to conflicts.

On the other hand, when anger becomes uncontrolled, it can lead to volatile behavior and harm both the individual experiencing the anger and those around them.

Volatile anger, also known as explosive anger, is a type of destructive anger characterized by sudden and intense outbursts. Unlike normal anger that may be triggered by a specific event or situation, volatile anger is often the result of a buildup of intense emotions over time. This type of anger is often accompanied by physical symptoms, such as:

  1. Raised blood pressure
  2. Sweating
  3. Increased heart rate

Some examples of situations that may trigger volatile anger include:

  1. A loved one making a critical remark or accusation
  2. A perceived injustice or mistreatment
  3. A perceived personal threat or attack
  4. Feeling overwhelmed or stressed

If you are struggling to control volatile anger, it may be helpful to:

  1. Practice mindfulness and relaxation techniques to manage stress and calm your emotions
  2. Engage in physical activity to help release pent-up emotions
  3. Seek therapy or counseling to address underlying emotional and psychological issues

If a loved one is struggling with volatile anger, it is important to approach them with empathy and understanding. You can help them by:

  1. Encouraging them to seek professional help
  2. Supporting them in finding healthy coping mechanisms
  3. Providing a safe and non-judgmental environment for them to talk about their feelings
  4. Avoiding confrontational or triggering situations

In conclusion, volatile anger can have damaging effects on both the individual experiencing it and those around them. However, with self-reflection, support from loved ones, and the appropriate resources, it is possible to manage and overcome this type of destructive anger.

Chronic Anger

Anger is a powerful emotion that can either have constructive or destructive effects. Constructive anger can motivate a person to take action and make positive changes in their life or in the world. On the other hand, destructive anger can lead to violence, harm to others, and negative consequences for the person experiencing it.

Normal anger is a natural and healthy response to a perceived threat or injustice. It is a short-lived emotion that can motivate a person to take action. For example, a person may feel angry after receiving a speeding ticket, but this anger is likely to dissipate within a short period of time.

Contrary to normal anger, chronic anger is a destructive form of anger that can have long-lasting and damaging effects. Chronic anger is characterized by a persistent feeling of anger that is difficult to control. It is a persistent and intense feeling of anger that can last for weeks, months, or even years. Chronic anger can have a negative impact on a person’s relationships, work, and overall well-being. Some examples of chronic anger include:

  1. A person who constantly feels angry and frustrated about their job and takes this anger home with them, affecting their relationships and home life.
  2. A person who has unresolved anger from a traumatic event, such as a divorce or the loss of a loved one, and continues to experience intense anger even years later.

You see, in these examples, anger is not a response to a specific event, but a persistent and intense feeling that affects multiple aspects of a person’s life.

Underlying causes of chronic anger can include:

  1. Unresolved childhood traumas
  2. Ongoing stress
  3. Mental health conditions such as depression or anxiety.

If you are struggling with chronic anger, it is important to understand your triggers and learn how to manage them. Triggers for chronic anger can include everyday stressors, personal problems, or perceived injustices.

To help yourself with chronic anger, it is helpful to:

  1. Practice mindfulness and relaxation techniques such as deep breathing, meditation, or yoga.
  2. Seek professional help, such as therapy or counseling.
  3. Identify and challenge negative thought patterns that contribute to feelings of anger.

If a loved one is struggling with controlling chronic anger, here are four steps you can take to support them:

  1. Encourage them to seek professional help.
  2. Listen to them and offer support and understanding.
  3. Help them identify and understand their triggers.
  4. Encourage healthy coping mechanisms, such as exercise or hobbies.

In conclusion, anger can be both constructive and destructive, and chronic anger can have long-lasting and damaging effects. However, managing and overcoming chronic anger with the right tools and support is possible.

Fear-Based Anger

Anger is a powerful and complex emotion that can manifest in many different ways. While it can serve as a protective mechanism in some situations, it can also be destructive when it becomes chronic or fear-based.

Fear-based anger is a type of anger that stems from a deep-seated sense of fear or insecurity. This type of anger is often intense and irrational and can cause harm to both the person experiencing it and those around them.

One way to distinguish fear-based anger from normal anger is to examine the underlying causes. Normal anger is often a response to a specific situation or event, whereas fear-based anger stems from a deeper sense of fear or insecurity. For example, someone may become angry when they feel threatened or challenged, such as when they are criticized or attacked. On the other hand, someone who is struggling with fear-based anger may become angry in response to perceived threats, even when there is no actual danger present.

The triggers for fear-based anger can vary, but they often involve situations that trigger feelings of insecurity or vulnerability. These triggers may include:

  1. Social situations
  2. Personal relationships
  3. Changes in routine
  4. Negative thoughts or memories, such as past experiences of abuse or trauma.

If you are struggling with fear-based anger, here are a few steps you can take to help yourself:

  1. Identify and understand your triggers: Understanding what triggers your fear-based anger can help you anticipate and avoid these triggers in the future.
  2. Practice self-reflection and mindfulness: Engaging in self-reflection and mindfulness can help you gain greater insight into your anger and improve your ability to control it.
  3. Seek professional help: A mental health professional can provide you with the support and guidance you need to overcome your anger issues. They can help you develop healthy coping mechanisms and provide strategies for managing your anger in the future.

If a loved one is struggling with fear-based anger, here are four steps you can take to support them:

  1. Listen to them and offer support and understanding: By being a supportive and non-judgmental listener, you can help your loved one feel heard and validated. Avoid engaging in arguments or confrontations and instead, focus on finding a solution together.
  2. Encourage them to seek professional help: If you suspect that your loved one has an anger problem, encourage them to see a mental health professional. A therapist can help them understand their anger and develop strategies for managing it.
  3. Help them identify their triggers: By working together, you can help your loved one understand what makes them angry and how they can avoid these triggers in the future. This can be a powerful step towards reducing their anger.
  4. Encourage healthy coping mechanisms: Help your loved one find healthy and productive ways to manage their anger, such as exercise, hobbies, or meditation. Encourage them to engage in activities that bring them joy and peace, and to avoid those that trigger their anger.

In conclusion, fear-based anger can be a destructive and intense emotion that can interfere with daily life and relationships. However, by understanding the underlying causes and triggers, and by seeking professional help and developing healthy coping mechanisms, it is possible to manage and overcome fear-based anger.

Manipulative Anger

Anger is a normal emotion that we all experience from time to time, but when it becomes manipulative, it can have a negative impact on our mental and physical health, as well as our relationships with others.

Manipulative anger is a type of destructive anger that is used to control or influence others. It differs from normal anger in that normal anger is a response to a perceived threat or injustice, while manipulative anger is an intentional use of anger to achieve a desired outcome.

For example, a person who is normally angry after receiving a speeding ticket may yell and scream, while a person using manipulative anger may use their anger to try to convince the police officer to let them off the hook.

Underlying causes of manipulative anger can include:

  1. A need for control
  2. Low self-esteem
  3. A lack of healthy coping mechanisms

Triggers for manipulative anger may include situations in which a person feels threatened or powerless.

To help yourself if you are struggling with controlling manipulative anger, it is important to:

  1. Practice self-reflection and identify the underlying causes of your anger: Understanding the reasons why you get angry can help you address the root of the problem and prevent future outbreaks. Engage in self-reflection and keep a journal to help you understand your triggers and what makes you feel angry.
  2. Seek professional help, such as therapy or counseling: A mental health professional can provide you with the support and guidance you need to overcome your anger issues. They can help you develop healthy coping mechanisms and provide strategies for managing your anger in the future.
  3. Develop healthy coping mechanisms, such as mindfulness and relaxation techniques: By learning to manage your emotions and stress levels, you can reduce the frequency and severity of your anger. Mindfulness and relaxation techniques, such as deep breathing, yoga, and meditation, can help you stay calm and centered, even in challenging situations.

If a loved one is struggling with controlling manipulative anger, here are four steps you can take to support them:

  1. Encourage them to seek professional help: If you suspect that your loved one has an anger problem, encourage them to see a mental health professional. A therapist can help them understand their anger and develop strategies for managing it.
  2. Listen to them and offer support and understanding: By being a supportive and non-judgmental listener, you can help your loved one feel heard and validated. Avoid engaging in arguments or confrontations and instead, focus on finding a solution together.
  3. Help them identify their triggers and underlying causes: By working together, you can help your loved one understand what makes them angry and how they can avoid these triggers in the future. This can be a powerful step towards reducing their anger.
  4. Encourage healthy coping mechanisms: Help your loved one find healthy and productive ways to manage their anger, such as exercise, hobbies, or meditation. Encourage them to engage in activities that bring them joy and peace, and to avoid those that trigger their anger.

In conclusion, understanding and managing anger is an important part of maintaining healthy relationships and overall well-being. If you or a loved one is struggling with manipulative anger, seeking professional help and developing healthy coping mechanisms can be an effective way to overcome this destructive emotion.

Passive Anger

Anger is a complex emotion that can take many forms, with some being more constructive than others. While anger can provide energy and motivation to take action, it can also turn destructive when it is not expressed or controlled properly.

One type of destructive anger is passive anger. Passive Anger is characterized by repressed emotions and behaviors that are indirectly expressed.

Passive anger can be difficult to distinguish from other emotions and behaviors, as it often manifests in indirect or covert ways.

For example, someone who is experiencing passive anger may exhibit behaviors such as:

  1. Sarcasm
  2. Sulking
  3. Withdrawal from social situations

Additionally, they may also experience physical symptoms, such as:

  1. Headaches
  2. Stomach problems
  3. Sleep disturbances

Some common triggers for passive anger include:

  1. Feeling powerless or helpless
  2. Perceived injustice or mistreatment
  3. Feeling unsupported or unvalued
  4. Inability to express emotions or feelings directly

If you are struggling with passive anger, it can be helpful to:

  1. Practice self-expression through journaling or talking to a trusted friend or therapist
  2. Engage in activities that promote self-awareness and emotional regulation, such as yoga or mindfulness practices
  3. Address any underlying psychological or emotional issues through therapy or counseling

If a loved one struggles with passive anger, it is essential to approach them with empathy and understanding. You can help them by:

  1. Encouraging them to express their feelings and emotions directly
  2. Supporting them in finding healthy coping mechanisms, such as journaling or exercise
  3. Avoiding actions that may trigger their passive anger, such as criticism or dismissiveness
  4. Providing a safe and non-judgmental environment for them to talk about their feelings

In conclusion, passive anger is a destructive form of anger that can have a significant impact on an individual’s mental and physical well-being.

However, it is possible to manage and overcome this type of anger with the right resources and support. Individuals can learn to express their emotions in a healthy and constructive manner by promoting self-expression, self-awareness, and emotional regulation.

Frustration-Based Anger

Frustration-based anger refers to anger that is triggered by feeling stuck or blocked in achieving a goal or overcoming an obstacle. It is a type of anger that arises when we experience situations that we perceive as frustrating or unfair, such as:

  1. Being stuck in traffic
  2. Dealing with a difficult coworker
  3. Facing a personal setback

In these situations, we may feel like our efforts are being thwarted, leading to feelings of helplessness and anger.

Underlying causes of frustration-based anger can include:

  1. A lack of control over the situation
  2. Feeling overwhelmed
  3. Having unrealistic expectations

Some common triggers for frustration-based anger include feeling like we are not making progress toward a goal, being repeatedly interrupted or ignored, or feeling like we are being treated unfairly.

If you are struggling with expressing frustration-based anger, here are four ways to help yourself:

  1. Practice mindfulness and deep breathing: When you feel anger arising, take a moment to focus on your breathing and calm your mind. This can help you feel more in control of your emotions.
  2. Communicate your feelings: If you are feeling frustrated, try to express your emotions in a clear and non-confrontational way. This can help you feel heard and may also help you find a solution to the problem.
  3. Take a break: Sometimes, taking a break from the situation can help you regain perspective and reduce feelings of frustration. Take a walk or engage in a relaxing activity to clear your mind.
  4. Seek professional help: If you find that your frustration-based anger is impacting your life in a significant way, consider speaking with a mental health professional. They can provide you with tools and strategies to better manage your emotions.

If a family member or loved one is struggling with expressing frustration-based anger, here are four ways you can help:

  1. Listen without judgment: Let your loved one know that you are there to support them and that you want to hear their perspective without judgment.
  2. Encourage self-reflection: Help your loved one reflect on the underlying causes and triggers of their frustration-based anger. This can help them better understand their emotions and develop strategies for managing them.
  3. Help them find healthy outlets: Encourage your loved one to engage in activities that can help them manage their stress, such as exercise, mindfulness, or creative pursuits.
  4. Be patient and supportive: Managing frustration-based anger can be a challenging process, so it is essential to be patient and supportive. Celebrate your loved one’s progress and be there for them through their setbacks.

In conclusion, frustration-based anger is a common type that can arise in day-to-day situations. Understanding its underlying causes and triggers can help us better manage our emotions. If you are struggling with frustration-based anger, there are several strategies you can use to help yourself, including mindfulness, communication, taking a break, and seeking professional help.

If a loved one is struggling with frustration-based anger, listening without judgment, encouraging self-reflection, helping them find healthy outlets, and being patient and supportive can all be helpful ways to support them.

Self-Abusive Anger

Self-abusive anger refers to a pattern of behavior in which an individual directs their anger towards themselves, either physically or emotionally. This type of anger is often characterized by self-harm, self-criticism, and negative self-talk. It can be challenging to recognize self-abusive anger because it can appear as though the person is angry with others, but in reality, they are directing their anger towards themselves.

Examples of self-abusive anger include:

  1. Punching walls or objects
  2. Cutting or burning oneself
  3. Engaging in risky or self-destructive behavior
  4. Engaging in negative self-talk or self-criticism
  5. Isolating oneself from others
  6. Refusing to seek help or support

Self-abusive anger can be caused by a variety of factors, including:

  1. Past trauma
  2. Low self-esteem
  3. A lack of healthy coping mechanisms

Common triggers include stress, frustration, and feelings of inadequacy.

If you are struggling to express your anger in a healthy way, there are several things you can do to help yourself:

  1. Practice relaxation techniques such as deep breathing or meditation
  2. Exercise regularly to release tension and stress
  3. Seek support from a therapist or support group
  4. Practice positive self-talk and affirmations to build self-esteem

If a loved one or family member is struggling with self-abusive anger, there are several ways you can offer support:

  1. Encourage them to seek professional help from a therapist or counselor
  2. Listen actively and without judgment when they express their feelings
  3. Help them identify healthy coping mechanisms, such as exercise or journaling
  4. Encourage them to support groups or appointments with mental health professionals

In conclusion, understanding and managing anger is an important part of maintaining healthy relationships and overall well-being. If you or a loved one is struggling with self-abusive anger, seeking professional help and developing healthy coping mechanisms can effectively overcome this destructive emotion.

Overwhelmed Anger

Overwhelmed anger is a type of anger that is characterized by feeling an intense and uncontrollable sense of anger that is difficult to manage or express. This type of anger can be triggered by a variety of factors, such as stress, frustration, or feeling out of control.

Examples of overwhelmed anger include:

  1. Yelling or screaming at others
  2. Physically lashing out at people or objects
  3. Breaking things or throwing objects
  4. Feeling a sense of being unable to control or manage one’s emotions

Overwhelmed anger can be caused by a variety of factors, such as experiencing a traumatic event, chronic stress, or a lack of healthy coping mechanisms. Common triggers include feeling overwhelmed, helpless, or out of control.

If you are struggling with overwhelmed anger, there are several things you can do to help yourself:

  1. Practice relaxation techniques such as deep breathing or meditation
  2. Engage in physical activity or exercise to release tension and stress
  3. Seek support from a therapist or support group
  4. Develop healthy coping mechanisms, such as journaling or talking with a trusted friend or family member

If a loved one or family member is struggling with overwhelmed anger, there are several ways you can offer support:

  1. Encourage them to seek professional help from a therapist or counselor
  2. Listen actively and without judgment when they express their feelings
  3. Help them identify healthy coping mechanisms, such as exercise or journaling
  4. Offer to accompany them to support groups or appointments with mental health professionals

In conclusion, overwhelmed anger is a destructive form of anger that can have a significant impact on an individual’s mental and physical well-being. However, with the right resources and support, it is possible to manage and overcome this type of anger. Individuals can learn to express their emotions in a healthy and constructive manner by promoting self-expression, self-awareness, and emotional regulation.

Retaliatory Anger

Retaliatory anger is a type of anger that is expressed as a response to feeling attacked, hurt, or wronged. This type of anger is often driven by a desire for revenge or retaliation and can lead to destructive or aggressive behavior.

Examples of retaliatory anger include:

  1. Seeking revenge against someone who has wronged you
  2. Engaging in verbal or physical confrontations with others
  3. Spreading rumors or gossip about others to hurt their reputation
  4. Sabotaging or undermining the success of others out of jealousy or resentment

Retaliatory anger can be caused by a variety of factors, including:

  1. Past experiences of being hurt or betrayed
  2. A lack of healthy coping mechanisms
  3. Low self-esteem

Common triggers include feeling disrespected, attacked, or undervalued.

If you or someone you know is struggling with retaliatory anger, it is important to seek help and support. Here are some tips to help manage and reduce retaliatory anger:

  1. Identify the root cause of your anger and explore healthy ways to address it, such as journaling or therapy.
  2. Practice self-care and relaxation techniques, such as meditation or exercise, to manage stress and anxiety.
  3. Develop healthy coping mechanisms for managing difficult emotions and conflicts, such as deep breathing or assertive communication.
  4. Seek support from trusted friends, family members, or mental health professionals.

For those supporting someone with retaliatory anger:

  1. Encourage them to seek professional help from a therapist or counselor.
  2. Listen actively and without judgment when they express their feelings.
  3. Help them identify healthy coping mechanisms, such as self-reflection or anger management techniques.
  4. Offer to accompany them to support groups or appointments with mental health professionals.

In conclusion, retaliatory anger can be a difficult emotion to manage, but it is important to seek help and support to address it. With the right tools and resources, individuals struggling with retaliatory anger can learn healthy ways to manage their emotions and develop better relationships with those around them. Remember, asking for help is a sign of strength, not weakness.

References:

  1. John Lydon (October 9, 2014) Anger Is An Energy: My Life Uncensored Dey Street Books
Personality and SelfPersonalityHealthNegative Personality
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